Maya’s Journey. On a Search for Whales

An example of Maya’s Boat School experience/experiment is her recent Whale Project.

Humpback whales Mother and Baby, by Maya

Humpback whales Mother and Baby, by Maya

After visiting the Pearl Islands in Panama where we met and observed humpback whales in their natural environment, Maya had to do a project, as a part of her education and development. The objective was to create a coherent written text using research and personal experience. For the research, we watched the 1998 documentary Whales An Unforgettable Journey, pausing the film each time there was an important information so that Maya could take notes of all the scientific and interesting facts mentioned. Next, she had to find an on-line article, read it and select some more facts and information related to the humpback whales. The final step was to write a text containing description of the animals, details about breeding, migration, as well as an account of Maya’s personal encounter with them, accompanied with a drawing.

Maya on a whale watching expedition

Maya on a whale watching expedition

The Whale Project

The whales are the largest creatures in the world. They are bigger than dinosaurs. The Blue Whale is the biggest of all whales measuring 30 meters (100 feet) in length and 200 tons. Its head is bigger than a small car and a young child could crawl inside its largest arteries. His heartbeat is so loud that you could hear it a mile away. The white skin on their heads is called ‘callosity’ and each and every pattern is unique like a fingerprint. Whales look like they have a frown. Only male humpbacks sing. The humpback whale’s songs travel a thousand miles away through the sea.

Photo by Maya

Photo by Maya

Whales migrate great distances every year. They travel between the cold waters of the North to the hot waters of the equator. In the cold they feed on krill and plankton by filtering them through their teeth called ‘baleens’. Plankton and krill are a massive protein source and thus the whales store fat called ‘blubber’ which helps them survive without eating anything during their migration for a few months. They travel 3000 miles away and lose a third of their weight during the trip, following the same ancient routs as their ancestors.

Photo by Maya

Photo by Maya

When they arrive to the hot waters of Hawaii and the Pearl Islands Archipelago in Panama they give birth. Humpback whale-mothers are pregnant for a year once every four years and give birth to a baby that weighs 2 to 3 tons. Like humans, whales are air-breathers and babies have to come out of the water for air every few minutes. Calves only drink milk for the first few months. While nursing, the baby gains 100 pounds a day in the first few weeks. Mothers protect their calves. Physical contact is very important for the mother and the baby. The young whales like to play and sometimes to block their mother’s blowhole in order to attract attention.

Photo by Maya

Photo by Maya

This year, I went in a small motorboat for whale-watching with my parents and a Russian couple we met in the Pearl Islands. We were looking for humpback whales but for one hour found no sign of them. Then we suddenly saw a mother and her calf breaching and waiving their tails with absolute joy. They both had masses of callosity on their heads. The mother was huge! It was nice. And then we saw about 12 spouts in the distance coming from the ocean. Whales! They were approaching us, jumping in the air and flipping their tails. It was terrific; we certainly took a bunch of photos. It was a nice journey on a search for whales. I liked it.

Maya S/V Fata Morgana

.

.

Killer Whale tribal design

Killer Whale tribal design

 

Watching humpback whales has been a valuable lasting lesson not only for Maya, but for all of us. Learning through nature and direct experiences with the support of research materials and documentary films has proven to be the best successful strategy. Such lessons are also easy, interesting and unforgettable.

Find and follow Maya on Instagram/Theyoungtraveler

 

*Related articles from the blog: Boat School

Find us on Facebook/The Life Nomadik

Support us on Patreon/The Life Nomadik

 

Share
Tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Follow Me